La Furia Roja

Spanish national team, nicknamed The Red Fury, or La Furia Roja, is rather old, though some thirty years younger than most of the notable European teams. Other nicknames the team goes by are the Fighting Bulls and, ironically, the Bullfighters. Though they won only one World Cup in 2010, they are still one of the eight nations that can boast with this achievement, in addition to being the first team to do so outside of Europe (the World Cup was held in South Africa that year).

They are known for their style of play that focuses on quick passes and controlling the zones of the pitch. The Red Fury chooses only the best of the Spanish, and sometimes English, players, so you can find players from Barcelona, Real Madrid, and Athletic Bilbao regularly in their setup. One of their more notable records is their winning streak of 35 matches between 2006 and 2009. Is the team really that good? Yes.

FIFA

Spain has been a part of FIFA from the very beginning. The first time they were able to enter a World Cup was in 1934 when they defeated Brazil and made it to the quarter-finals. While the Civil War made the country lose its grounds on the international stage for a while, forcing many teams to change their names, they were back in 1950, winning the fourth place.

In 1994, there was a bit of controversy as one of their players was elbowed in the face and there was no foul recognized in their match against Italy. What’s controversial about it is the fact that the quarter-finals might have turned out differently, as Spain would have had a penalty kick. As it stands, this was just one might-have-been.

The monumental success in FIFA came in 2010 in South Africa, when the team won the title. The extra time against the Netherlands landed the Fighting Bulls the one and only goal that made them champions. History was made that day, as Spain became the first team to win the World Cup outside of Europe.

Playing Style

The tiki-taka received both praise and scorn as an effective method of both attacking and defending, as well as stalling for time. Johan Cruyff made this style of play Barcelona’s trademark and it soon became the official playing style of the entire country.

It differs from the Route One style that focuses mainly on the goalie targeting a single player that is attacking. This style of play is quick and effective, whereas tiki-taka is much calmer and perceived by some as uninteresting. Regardless, it is one of the reasons Barcelona and the Spanish national team are both very efficient.

Kits and Stadium

The team’s kits are made by Adidas, though, for a short time, their kit supplier was also Le Coq Sportif. The home colours are red and yellow for the jersey with dark blue shorts, and away they play mostly in white.

The team does not possess a real national stadium, though they usually play at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium in Madrid. That one is designated for more important matches, whereas friendlies are played in a previously designated provincial stadium.